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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from president obama or mitt romney, grassroots religious groups were active on both sides. evangelical voters were divided dung t primary season, but in the end, they rallied around romney, despite some concerns about voting for a mormon candidate. still, their support didn't put him over the top. obama narrowly won the catholic vote, thanks to a strong showing among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religio freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for fr
or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats conress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and fincial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school m
said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was elected as prime minister, a post he held before between 2006 and 2007. he's the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. abe filled the cabinet with familiar faces and new ones. he appointed suga as chief cabinet secretary. that makes him the head government spokesperson. aso is his deputy. he will serve as finance minister and financial services minister. the new foreign minister is fumio kishida. he served in the previous cabinet. onodera is defense minister. he's well versed in dip ro mat tick and security issues. he chaired a lower house committee in okinawa and the northern territories. a newly created post for akira amari for the council on economic and fiscal policy which was cut by the previous government. we asked people in central tokyo what they expect from the abe administration. >> translator: i hope it will fix the economy and energize japan. >> translator: i want a new cabinet to use tax-free on the tsunami survivors. i really have a high expectation about this. >> translator: i
their races. on capitol hill the election brought the total number of women in the senate to 20, 16 democrats and four republicans, and 78 women in the house, 58 democrats, 20 republicans. as budget negotiations continued to loom, women were asked whether having equal female representation in congress would have chaed things. >> we would have dealt with that. it's critical to the country. we need to provide certainty for businesses for our families. so they will know what they're looking at over the next year and again as women i think we tend to be consensus builders, we like to get lots of inbuilt then work together to get things done. >> marriage equality laws passed during the election took effect in washington state and maryland as same sex couples lined up to formalize their unions. now the issue goes to the supreme court. earlier in the year the court affirmed the legality of obamacare, also known as the patient protection and affordable care act. with that 5-4 decision and the re-election of president obama states are now working towards putting the law into effect. and even before pr
: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. thparty won por in ts month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this law an improved situation for these ch
they believed in this thing strongly. and he said, i'd rather have lost the entire election and won the soldiers' vote than won the election and lost the soldiers. >> what about the scene where you, where the amendment is in doubt, lincoln himself seems skeptical that they're going to make it, and seward has been pushing him to be careful, not to let it benown that he's around town trying to rouse up votes. and they're in the theater and mary lincoln turns -- well, let's look at it. >> you think i'm ignorant of what you're up to because you haven't discussed this scheme with me as you ought to have done. when have i ever been so easily bamboozled? i believe you when you insist that amending the constitution and abolishing slavery will end this war and since you are sending our son into the war, woe into you if you fail to pass the amendment. >> seward doesn't want me leaving big muddy footprints all over town. >> no one has ever lived who knows better than you the proper placement of footfalls on treacherous paths. seward can't do it. you must. because if you fail to acquire the necessary votes,
up the news of this holiday. then, part two of our conversation about upcomingin elections: house races in illinois and south carolina, an high-profile politics in new jersey. we have two health stories. first, are annual mammogramswn necessary? betty ann bowser examines theil conflicting answers.or >> it's going to result in an excessive treatment required for people that delay getting their cancer detected.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity meas
by hawaii's governor. the new senator said he'll seek election in his own right, in 2014. inouye wanted hawaii congresswoman colleen hanabusa to take his seat. she said today she respects the governor's choice. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: we turn now to russia, where a proposed new law on adoptions, causing alarm in the united states, came a step closer to being enacted today. ray suarez has the story. >> reporter: in moscow today, president vladimir putin said he does intend to sign a bill that bars americans from adopting russian children. >> you know, after all in the world there are probably a lot places where the quality of life is better than re, but so what? are we going to send all the children there? maybe we should move there ourselves. we need to support the proposal which is directed at doing everything in our own country in order to provide for a worthy future for all of our children. >> reporter: yesterday, russian lawmakers gave final approval to the legislation. it was, pointedly, named after a russian toddler who died aft
government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his governme's vions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country's economy. japan's debt is projected to reach $12.8 trillion by next march. the ratio to the country's gross domestic product is 226%, the worst among developed nations. abe has pledged to halve the fiscal deficit by march 2016. the new government intends to finance its spending without borrowing by fiscal 2020. they hope to achieve the goal by cutting expenses. this would involve squeezing social security costs. all eyes are on
.it seems that n ratcratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like tpain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentially a larger agreement. >> susie: real quickly this has been frustrating from everybody from wall street to ceo to average american taxpayers. even the president saw that playing out. how do you seep see ts playing out. will we have a deal on monday. >> it'we haven't heard them tal. but the hurdle remains in the house. 9 odds look like we'll go over for some period of time what bliss brings them back to a deal at that time is anybody's guess. >> susie: we'll be reporting more on monday. thanks a lot darren. washington bureau chief darren >> reporter: still ahe, harnessg the poweof play. we'll take a look at how companies can benefit from giving their employees a little free
elected governments are-- their hands are always tied by the social morees and cultural constriction of that country, their own country and india is a thriving democracy but it is also very conservative. and there are many traditio which would prent tho kibsdf this that from happening. so i think it's great that we have female leaders right now, the head of the governing party in india is a woman but that doesn't mean that she can make her only issue that of women's issues. if the rest of the government isn't going to follow along, india's government is very constricted in many ways from what it can do. so unfortunately this hasn't been made a big case, a big issue of yet so far but i actually think that this could be the time. i think that this case could give an opening. >> well, news from singapore of the young woman's death after the gang rape broke during the middle of the night in the india. so indians in their millions will awake to the news that the woman has died. have we crossed a threshold. is this an issue that simply can't be put back in the bottle and forgotten? >> well
to watch over the economy after the election are watching the fiscal cliff with growing alarm. >> it's going to mean a lot of problems, the job situation will actually get worse because then companies can't borrow money and if you can't borrow money, then you're gonna have problems with hiring employees and stuff like that. >> reporter: the holidays are usually times that bring filies together and many would like to see that happen at the national level as well. >> so i think the tax issue and the job issue needs to be looked at together and it shouldn't be divided among rich or middle class, or lower class it shouldn't be any class, it should be america coming together and right now in our house that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporr: aeadyhere is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was ser
it possible that the elect one, the messiah, the righteous one, the holy one"-- any title they use of jesus-- "is it possible that such a one could be oppressed, persecuted, and executed?" they go into the hebrew scriptures, and, of course, what they find is that it's almost like a job description of being god's righteous one, to be persecuted and even executed. >> and the amazing thing is, they said, "hey, pilate's right. he was the king of the jews. and, moreover, god has vindicated this claim that he is the king of the jews by raising him from the dead." >> ( dramatized ): an angel of the lord, descending from heaven, came and rolled back the stone. he said to the women, "jesus who was crucified, he has been raised. come, see the place where he lay." >> the stories about the resurrection in the gospels make two very clear points: first of all, that jesus really, really was dead; and secondly, that his disciples really and with absolute conviction saw him again afterwards. the gospels are equally clear that it's not a ghost. i mean, even though the raised jesus walks through a shut door i
're talking about appointing a new senator, or electing somebody, or appointing a member to a board, people are saying why not women, because they're used to seeing more women in more leadership positions, and that has a real role model effect, but it also changes people's perspective about who can be a really strong contributor. >> susan: so what's your advice to young ambitious womenustcoming out of college or those who have an mba or law degree and want to ride to the top? >> i think they should build their careers in places where they can see that there is support for women and where women have been successful, and that could be a large company that has women at the top. it could be an industry where women are really flourishing. but there's no denying we're going to see a lot of women in a lot of places, and they're going to be very successful, and that's fantastic. >> susie: our partners at stanford >> susie: our partners at stanford university have new research on how women in business tend to turn traits like confidence and assertiveness, on and off, to fit the situation on their cl
elected officials to come together to reach common ground on the fiscal cliff. that's "nightly business report" for wednesday, december 26. have a great evening everyone. we'll see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captned by mia access group wgbh access.wgbh.org
's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3. >> reporter: january 3 is the deadline for the new congress to start work. if a fiscal cliff fix isn't passed by then, the start of a new congress will likely delay matters even more. which is why the focus now is on reaching a nano-deal. >> the minimal that they can put together to avoid the fiscal cliff which will have sadly almost no impact on the long- term debt trajectory, but right now, neither markets nor the congress care about that. >> reporter: congress has never been terrific at long-range planning, but now the definition of long range seems to be 48 hours. >> you don't hear people talking, well a year from now, we allyeed to be here. you hear, well we need to do that this week. we need to do that day after tomorrow. this short-time frame horizon is new and i think people who think we are going to have tax reform and entitlement reform next year are way, way off base. >> cutting short his vacation but it's unclear whether he has the power to force a last minute solution through a deeply divided congress. >> darr
. there is an oath of entry. it is very much a monastic community. x the congregation of the elect must pledge himself to live according to the rule of theo community, to love all the children of light, and to hate all the children of darkness." >> the essenes are what we might best call an apocalyptic sect of judaism. an apocalyptic sect is one that? thinks of itself as, first of all, the true form of the religion. yt >> by apocalyptic expectation, i mean that some group has a... an apocalupsis in greek-- a revelation that god is going to finally solve the problem of injustice, unrighteousness, evil in the world, by totally eradicating the evil. that's the terrible price of apocalypse; there's going to be %gzm totally eradicating evil-- and we, the good, whoever we are, are going to live with god, be it heaven on earth, or earth in heaven, forever, in justice and holiness and righteousness. >> among the dead sea scrolls, we hear not of just one messiah, but at least two messiahs. some of their writings talk about a messiah of aaron, a priestly figure who will come to restore the temple at je
was somehow rooted in the press buyas or elected officials who have gun-free school zones. you know, judy, the reality is, and it's a terrible reality, since robert kennedy died in the ambassador hotel on june 4th, 1968, more americans have died from gunfire than died in all the war, all the wars of this country's history, from the revolutionary to the civil war, world war i, world war ii, and those 43 years. we have half the guns 245 are in the world are in the united states. i mean guns are a problem. and i think they still have to be confronted. >> woodruff: something like 280 million guns. >> we're to the going to get rid of all those guns. that's to the going to happen. >> daniel patrick moynihan and tax ammunition. >> i think there are a series of reasonable things we could do, even going back to the 1990s when it comes to ammunition, magazine size, and the sought-- certain types of semiautomatic weapons. you should be able to make that case. we swung so far in this debate in the libertarian direction, that those are fairly minimal burdens on anyone's rights when it comes to this. i
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)